I see dead people: Which of Ayn Rand’s heroes would have been aborted post-Planned Parenthood?

Who is John Galt? Ayn Rand's moral ideal, in the world she prayed for and achieved, was sold as spare parts, with the rest of him left to stain discarded rags.

Who is John Galt? Ayn Rand’s moral ideal, in the world she prayed for and achieved, was sold as spare parts, with the rest of him left to stain discarded rags.

I wrote this yesterday, and I admit to my chagrin that it was the first time it had occurred to me:

Yaron Brook[’s] actual job consists of pretending […] that Howard Roark’s and John Galt’s mammies, had the condoms failed after 1973, would not have devoured their unborn genius babies on Ayn Rand’s own advice.

Shocking? You’re an idolator. But shockingly true, certainly. Rand makes a big point of celebrating the accomplishments of thoroughly unwanted babies.

What happens to babies like that, post Roe v. Wade? Do you want to blank out like Yaron Brook and the entire Ayn Rand Institute?

So which others of Ayn Rand’s major characters would have missed the cut by curettage?

From The Fountainhead: Gail Wynand, surely. Catholics is Catholics, but poor Catholics is a smellier kettle of fish. Katie Halsey, too, though Peter Keating might have scraped (ahem) by. Mike Donnigan, the only all-the-way decent person Rand ever wrote, could easily have fallen to the knife, and I have my doubts about Steven Mallory.

From Atlas Shrugged: Hank Rearden would have found his future in medical waste, and possibly Dan Conway, too, along with half or more of the Colorado upstarts. And Eddie Willers and Cheryl Brooks might have found each other at last – in the dumpster behind the clinic.

When the Planned Parenthood ghouls argue for abortion, they are at least claiming to seek a eugenic end to justify their homicidal means. The abortion championed by Ayn Rand and the The Ayn Rand Institute is outrageously dysgenic: Its goal and its actual practical outcome is to rob humanity of its best exemplars in each new generation.

Who is John Galt? Ayn Rand’s moral ideal, in the world she prayed for and achieved, was sold as spare parts, with the rest of him left to stain discarded rags.

When you see the lights go out in New York City, remember whose hand was on the switch.

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  • advancedatheist

    The sick, hostile portrayal of family life in Rand’s novels deserves more attention than it has gotten so far. You just don’t see any character in The Fountainhead or Atlas Shrugged who has a healthy relationship with his or her parents or siblings.

    Hank Rearden’s father doesn’t even exist at all, apparently. Did he and his brother Philip have the same father? If Hank was born legitimate, then his father died, and then Philip was born illegitimate because his mother slept around when she became a widow, that would provide a plausible explanation for why they resented each other and why Hank didn’t respect his mother.

    Dagny’s and Francisco’s characters would also make more sense if Rand had showed that they had experienced and sophisticated fathers or other senior male relatives, Warren Buffett types, who explained to them early on how the world works. Instead their respective fathers conveniently die off in time for them to inherit their family businesses in their early 20’s, and they mysteriously know things about running vast enterprises that most young people wouldn’t have the ability to know.

    Rand somehow transmitted this hostility towards family life to Nathaniel Branden, who had few ideas of his own. I read several of his self-esteem books in the 1990’s, and I noticed how often Branden condemns parents as the enemies of children’s psychological development. Which of course makes no sense in average cases, otherwise how did humanity manage to muddle through for so many thousands of years before Rand and Branden came along?

    So given the horrors of family life in Rand’s world view, it shouldn’t surprise anyone why she celebrates sterility as a virtue.